LDMuseum_BlogLogo_Mitraa

Prof. Ratan Parimoo

Director - L.D. Museum and N.C. Mehta Gallery (Ahmedabad)

Prof. Ratan Parimoo

Ratan Parimoo has a Ph.D. from M.S. University, Baroda, where he also taught for 34 years, serving as Head of the Department of Art History and Aesthetics (196691) and as Dean of the Faculty of Fine Arts (197581). Among his numerous publications are Paintings of the Three Tagores (1973) , republished in expanded version as Art of Three Tagores: From Revival to Modernity (2010), and Historical Development of Contemporary Indian Art (2009). Since 2007 he has been the Director of the L.D. Museum and N.C. Mehta Art Gallery, Ahmedabad. He has completed the N.C. Mehta Collection Vol.I, Gujarati School and Jaina Manuscript Paintings in 2010, and Vol.II, Rajasthani, Central Indian, Pahari and Mughal Paintings, in 2013.

Other Interests : Reading, Listening Music, Painting

Painting of Pushtimargi Bhitar ki Baithak (temple) at Gokul in Kasturbhai Lalbhai Collection

Painting of Pushtimargi Bhitar ki Baithak (temple) at Gokul in Kasturbhai Lalbhai Collection

KLC.1840 Pushtimargi Bhitar ki Baithak (temple) at Gokul, Water Colour on Paper, Rajasthani School, 18th century A.D. Inscribed: Shri Hari, Shri Gokul ki Veth.. (Baithak) Bhitar ki.

According to K.K. Shastri's biography of Vallabhacharya, there were three baithaks in Gokul which this author has numbered as first, second and third. It is a pleasant surprise to find that the second baithak was known as 'bhitar ki badhi baithak', which nomenclature when tallied with the inscription on KLC.1840, corroborates that this painting represents the particular baithak at Gokul. This baithak was the venue of Vallabhacharya's katha recitations and also where he shared his meals. A miracle was performed here by Vallabhacharya when the mahants of Vrindavan intended to test him. One Shyamnanda had been sent with a Saligram hidden in a purse. Gokul was also the seat of Shri Gokulnathji, one of the seven svarupas of Shrinathji. Vitthalnathji had set up the worship of the seven icons at seven...

Key words : Pushtimargi Bhitar ki Baithak, L D Museum, Gokul

Categories : Painting

Sculptures from Ladol, Mehsana District, North Gujarat

Sculptures from Ladol, Mehsana District, North Gujarat

The Museum has a number of marble sculptures and other fragments from the site of Ladol, a village near Vijapur, Mehsana district, North Gujarat. At least about 9 pithas, the base of Tirthankara images, have inscriptions between the dates V.S.1313-1337 = 1256-1280 A.D. These are presumably the dates of installation of seated Tirthankara images. As many as 5 standing Tirthankara images in Kāyotasarga posture also belong to this site. One of the inscriptions mentions the name of the temple Kanhuvasahika and the name of donor 'Shreshthi Kanhu'. One of standing Tirthankara images, Śāntināth, is intact, along with its inscription, which was installed in V.S.1326 = 1269 A.D. The name of the village in the inscriptions is mentioned as Lātāpalli. However, no ruined medieval period temple is recorded from Ladol village in recent surveys. From the inscriptions it is clear that the temple was dedicated by Shresthi Kanhu, and therefore given the nomenclature of...

Key words : Jain sculpture, Tirthankar sculpture, Ladol, Mehsana District, North Gujarat

Categories : Sculpture, In House Blog

Portraiture in India

Portraiture in India

The art-historical study of the art of painting in India has been going on now for more than one century. This study carried out mostly through the 20th century has convincingly established how the Indian painters have documented our own culture and society. Simultaneously the involvement with portraiture, the human face, facial features, resemblances and expressions, has been quite considerable. The western scholars in the early years of the 20th century have made certain assumptions regarding the shortcomings of the Indian painters which include two specific aspects. One, that no independent status was given to the genre of portraiture and two, regarding the degree of illusionistic naturalism. The pioneering art-historical scholar, Ananda Coomaraswmy, although had already discovered portrait drawings both in Rajput (Rajasthani and Pahari) and Mughal schools, yet he put forth a theory of 'ideal portraiture', which has been misunderstood and also needs to be questioned. Essentially...

Key words : Portraiture, Portrait in India, naturalistic delineation in portrait, Anand Coomaraswamy, C. Sivarammurti, Kalidasa's Sanskrit Kavyas, Reference of Portrain in Sanskrit Poetry

Categories : Painting, In House Blog, Art History